Welcome to Noah X Arts! Art by Noah Xifr and representing the Symbolic Realism art movement. Symbolic Realism = Surrealism + Conceptual Art.
I discuss #SymbolicRealism #art #artist #creativity #curation #marketing #community #streetart share and enjoy!
Noah Xifr | Artist, Noah X Arts
Email: info@NoahXArts.com
Twitter: @NoahXArts
LinkedIn.com/in/NoahXArts
Facebook.com/NoahXArts
www.NoahXArts.com

 

Introducing PAIN FULL NESS my new graphic novel series

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PAIN FULL NESS 1 VOICE BOXED – Quiet - plate 6

2012-13, 11”W x 14”H, Pencil, Charcoal, Markers, Ink, Paint.

How do you. Like. PAIN? No, not so much? My new graphic novel series, and upcoming Kickstarter is actually all about PAIN. 

PAIN FULL NESS - the new hybrid graphic novel / artist book series by artist / author Noah Xifr is a psychological exploration. PAIN FULL NESS 1 VOICE BOXED explores the PAINs of censorship, and how we can persevere and work towards self-expression. Quiet, the 6th plate in the book, evocatively depicts the struggle with self-censorship.

The first character - The Key, symbolizing our ability to get ourselves out of pain - solemnly sheds a tear. Their mouth is zipped shut to “Contain all pain”. Their brain yells out “Can’t Understand” “What am I saying” under pressure symbolized by the 1 TON QUIET anvil. The second character - the Voice Box, a dragon that lives in your throat - is materializing within a jail with a lock holding back a plea for “Help”. The third character - Hurt Heart, symbolizing our emotional state - shuns help, wanders off, and sheds a tear of blood while mumbling “Hurt”. 

The mood of the piece is heightened by a color palette combining cool bluish greys, hints of warmth and earth tones. The entire piece is drawn and painted with immense detail, in a surreal and conceptual manner exemplary of the Symbolic Realism Art movement. 

Enjoy the PAIN! And have a good day.

 Noah Xifr | Artist Curator, Noah X Arts
  NoahXArts@gmail.com  
  Twitter: @NoahXArts 
  Facebook.com/NoahXArts 
  Linkedin.com/in/NoahXArts 

GO get some art, Brooklyn! 1 THE ARTIST CURATOR

Artist Curator - GO Bk me & poster

  This article has two parts containing professional tips for Artist Curators (additional GO related articles will address Art Marketing and Community Relations). These reflections were gathered while re-purposing our working studio into a more gallery-friendly exhibit space in preparation for the GO Brooklyn Art - Open Studio weekend.

  The community arts experiment GO Brooklyn Art organized by the Brooklyn Museum of Art, invited engagement from artists across the borough of Brooklyn. During open studio weekend September 8&9, on this month-iversary, more than 1700 artists, including myself, opened their studios, their creative sanctuaries, to the general art-going public.

My studio, Art Studio B50, is located in the Sunset Park neighborhood of Brooklyn, an emerging arts enclave. Within the historic Brooklyn Army Terminal in Building B, journeying past a former army boxcar train, are the chashama - Spaces to Create art studios. Inside this creative hub, amongst a maze of 50+ other artist’s studios, is Art Studio B50

1 - THE ARTIST CURATOR - Part 1

The following numbers are used to suggest a sequence. These tips can come in handy in preparing for exhibition design, studio visits, presentations, book launches, gallery re-hanging or managing your art inventory. 

Artist Curator - Octo-Bird painting in progress  1. About a week before, complete art products or bring work in progress to a comfortable pause. Resist the urge to paint up to the last minute. Leaving my Octo-Bird painting when it does “Need More” was not easy, but I shall return! You need a break from the art creation process. Allow enough time for the presentation process to flourish. Getting a moment away from the actual art creation was a necessary step. This breather helped me to fully transform my space, and decide how to best showcase my artwork. 

  2. Air out your area. We may be immune to our art supplies’ toxicity (oil paints, turpentine, fixative, etching acids, inks, wax, glue, rubber, chemicals, blood, sweat, and tears), but visitors may find fumes nauseating. Stopping the art creation process in advance gives time for any built up toxic fumes to disperse. Use a standing rotating fan. Visitors notice unbearable heat. When I visit galleries, I may not be as inclined to experience art if the exhibit space is too hot or too cold. With air circulation, or light air conditioning, I am happy gallery hopper. I can then relax, consider, and hopefully be inspired. 

3. Dismount and set aside all artwork. All finished, in progress, and visible inventory need to be placed somewhere they can be momentarily invisible or forgotten. Get down to the bare walls and tables. Clearing the space will help you clear your mind. With a blank space, like a blank canvas, I had a fresh start. Considering the negative space and physical proportions of the artwork helped assess the optimal viewing space.  

Artist Curator - Creative High 5!  4. Clean all surfaces and give them a fresh coat of paint. Fresh newly painted walls are inspiring. The wall painting process is a meditative, almost sculptural, process. Each roller or brushstroke builds up or evens out layered textures. Invest in primer and a solid top coat house paint that is not too translucent or too viscous. Give one undercoat of primer, leaving sufficient time to dry, and then apply one or two coats of a sealant paint. While painting multiple coats I ended up with white hands, despite being careful. Creative high 5! 

  5. Draft a plan of attack for your physical space. As visual people, drawing a model of our space helps. Use graph paper to sketch a scale model, laying out the design of your entire floor and wall space. Include wall breaks, tables, light sources, and cut out color squares to represent artwork to make it more real. Consider your lighting quantity and angles, too much light on glossy artwork can cause blinding glare, and not enough can make artwork look dull. Using your drawn floor plan, test out several arrangements. 

Stay tuned for my next post, completing the professional tips for Artist Curators, on the month-iversary of GO Brooklyn Art. 

What are your tips for artist curators? Did you find these 5 tips useful so far? There are 5 more to come, what would you include? Please leave your comments, and share your experiences with exhibit design and art curation below.  

Good coffee, good love, and good art to all!

Artist Curator  Noah Xifr | Artist Curator, Noah X Arts
  NoahXArts@gmail.com  
  Twitter: @NoahXArts 
  Facebook.com/NoahXArts 
  Linkedin.com/in/NoahXArts  

Feature - Portfolio
Half Hearted Confusion – oil paint on wood, 18”W x 36”H, 2007
This confused person has a wiggly body, visibly wobbly skeleton, and shrunken sad face. The disturbed land shifts between sea and sky. A sunken half-hearted body springs the word “Confusion”. Live life with a full heart, not just a clear mind, and things make more sense. 

Feature - Portfolio

Half Hearted Confusion – oil paint on wood, 18”W x 36”H, 2007

This confused person has a wiggly body, visibly wobbly skeleton, and shrunken sad face. The disturbed land shifts between sea and sky. A sunken half-hearted body springs the word “Confusion”. Live life with a full heart, not just a clear mind, and things make more sense. 

Feature - Portfolio (portraiture)
Day of Birth Ayla 5 – acrylic paint, ink, pencil and marker on paper, 7”W x 10”H, 2011
This gentle portrait, memorializes toddler Ayla Rose. The artist’s daughter’s spirit perseveres with her coy clever and friendly manner. She is bathed in purplish pink tones, her favorite colors. Five stars, representing each year of her life with a degenerative condition, spin off her long pony tail, watching over her.

Feature - Portfolio (portraiture)

Day of Birth Ayla 5 – acrylic paint, ink, pencil and marker on paper, 7”W x 10”H, 2011

This gentle portrait, memorializes toddler Ayla Rose. The artist’s daughter’s spirit perseveres with her coy clever and friendly manner. She is bathed in purplish pink tones, her favorite colors. Five stars, representing each year of her life with a degenerative condition, spin off her long pony tail, watching over her.

Feature - Artwork in progress

Need More – acrylic paint, charcoal, pencil and marker on paper, 36”W x 30”H, 2012

This artwork in progress is the first in a new thematic series. This painting will serve as an affirmation encouraging Abundance, countering a place of scarcity. The hybrid creature Octo-bird (red octopus / crow) can silently and swiftly conquer the sea, as well as the air and land. Octo-bird, with 8 tentacles, comes from a place of scarcity, having so little, and will prosper. It’s tentacles, working in unison, scrape the surrounding cave. It is pressurizing earth to form rocks and ultimately a cut diamond, symbolizing the psychological journey to achieve Abundance. The octo-bird also controls its environment, sparking a fire in a cave to form its own watery sky. These symbols are empowering, promoting strength and perseverance, over time and space and environment. The painting process involved detailed and gestural brush strokes to evolve and push the tentacle formations. This is a character in Noah’s upcoming graphic novel / artist book “Inkling.” 

Feature - portfolio
Heart Tied | First Steps – oil paint on wood, 2’W x 4’H, 2009
A bird demon shrieks at a blood moon, tying its heartstrings. Negotiating love, we can be contained or social. The left foot takes a tentative step. The artist uses a hybrid bird person to explore heavy emotional concepts in a subtle yet graphic manner. Noah raised birds as a child.  

Feature - portfolio

Heart Tied | First Steps – oil paint on wood, 2’W x 4’H, 2009

A bird demon shrieks at a blood moon, tying its heartstrings. Negotiating love, we can be contained or social. The left foot takes a tentative step. The artist uses a hybrid bird person to explore heavy emotional concepts in a subtle yet graphic manner. Noah raised birds as a child.  

Video Feature - My #artists interview aired on Eyewitness News NY Channel 7 this Monday am in my new #art studio @chashama go to 1:14 
http://abclocal.go.com/wabc/video?id=8515117 
Rundown - 
1:15 while drawing plate 13 of Pain Full Ness 1 Voice Boxed (my latest graphic novel / artist book hybrid) you can see my latest red octo-bird painting behind me. 
1:19 close up of my penciling technique
1:23 voice over about co-working artist professional spaces.
Enjoy!